What types of LEDs are there?

What types of LEDs are there?

There is a whole range available for nearly all types of light fittings. You can choose varying levels of brightness and colour temperatures depending on how you’d like to use the light.

Brightness: LEDS need much less electricity to produce the same amount of light. So to choose the right brightness, look for lumens, instead of watts.

As a rough guide, 420 lumens is suitable for a table or floor lamp, 800 lumens is suitable for a small room while 1300 lumens is suitable for a large room.

Colour: LEDs are available in a range of colour temperatures. Warm White is a soft, warm light similar to incandescent and halogen bulbs. It produces a calming and relaxing light that is great for bedrooms, living rooms, and dining rooms. Cool White is a neutral light which is good for any situation where you want to foster alertness, such as kitchen benches, garages and workshops.


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